Homebrew: Install the Typesafe Stack

Old news: New machine -> new setup
Exciting alternatives: Homebrew -> “Typesafe Stack”

brew install scala sbt maven giter8

Homebrew is a package manager that keeps things tidy under the /usr/local/ directory, which is what we are using here to have Scala and friends installed. giter8 is a template Github archetype-maven-like command line tool that grows up to be the defacto way of bootstrapping a Scala-related project.

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Spring Email Testing using GreenMail

I’ve been ignoring setting up a proper unit-test regarding email functionality for some time now mainly because most of the cases a quick and dirty test email to myself would do it. Well, quick’n’dirty hack no more and this is a proper way to test your Spring Email functionality using an easy to use library called GreenMail.

Let’s start with the POM:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0"
         xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
         xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/xsd/maven-4.0.0.xsd">
    <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>

    <groupId>SpringEmailTest</groupId>
    <artifactId>SpringEmailTest</artifactId>
    <version>1.0-SNAPSHOT</version>

    <build>
        <plugins>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
                <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
                <version>2.3.2</version>
                <configuration>
                    <source>${java.version}</source>
                    <target>${java.version}</target>
                    <encoding>${project.build.sourceEncoding}</encoding>
                </configuration>
            </plugin>
        </plugins>
    </build>

    <dependencies>
        <!--Spring Dependencies-->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-context</artifactId>
            <version>${spring.version}</version>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-context-support</artifactId>
            <version>${spring.version}</version>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-test</artifactId>
            <version>${spring.version}</version>
        </dependency>
        <!--Testing Dependencies -->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>junit</groupId>
            <artifactId>junit</artifactId>
            <version>${junit.version}</version>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>com.icegreen</groupId>
            <artifactId>greenmail</artifactId>
            <version>${greenmail.version}</version>
        </dependency>
        <!--Email Dependencies -->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>com.sun.mail</groupId>
            <artifactId>javax.mail</artifactId>
            <version>${javax-mail.version}</version>
        </dependency>


    </dependencies>
    <properties>
        <java.version>1.6</java.version>
        <project.build.sourceEncoding>UTF-8</project.build.sourceEncoding>
        <spring.version>3.2.2.RELEASE</spring.version>
        <junit.version>4.10</junit.version>
        <javax-mail.version>1.5.0</javax-mail.version>
       <greenmail.version>1.3.1b</greenmail.version>
    </properties>


</project>

The Spring Configuration looks like this:

package com.dimitrisli.springEmailTest.config;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Value;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Bean;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Configuration;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.ImportResource;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.PropertySource;
import org.springframework.mail.javamail.JavaMailSenderImpl;

import java.util.Properties;

@Configuration
@ImportResource(value = "classpath:/spring/appXMLContext.xml")
@PropertySource(value = "classpath:/properties/application.properties")
public class AppConfig {

    @Bean
    public JavaMailSenderImpl emailSender(@Value("${email.host}") String emailHost,
                                          @Value("${email.port}") Integer emailPort,
                                          @Value("${email.username}") String username,
                                          @Value("${email.pass}") String password){
        JavaMailSenderImpl emailSender = new JavaMailSenderImpl();
            emailSender.setHost(emailHost);
            emailSender.setPort(emailPort);
            emailSender.setUsername(username);
            emailSender.setPassword(password);
            //emailSender.setDefaultEncoding("UTF_8");
            Properties mailProps = new Properties();
                mailProps.setProperty("mail.transport.protocol","smtp");
                mailProps.setProperty("mail.smtp.auth","true");
                mailProps.setProperty("mail.smtp.starttls.enable","true");
                mailProps.setProperty("mail.debug","false");
                emailSender.setJavaMailProperties(mailProps);
        return emailSender;
    }
}

A few things to note here:
– The @Configuration annotation marks the Spring Java Configuration context.
– The @PropertySource is retrieving the properties file from classpath. Apparently @PropertySource is not playing well with @Value injection therefore a workaround this is to include an XML context just to incude the property placeholder reference.
– The @ImportResource is the way of including an XML context file from the classpath.
– The beans are defined using the @Bean annotation.
– The @Value annotation is automatically injecting the properties values into the variables.

The referenced application.properties that is including the Email details (in this case setup to be Gmail) looks like this:

email.host=smtp.gmail.com
email.port=25
email.username=yourGmailAtgmailDotcom
email.pass=yourPass

As noted above to resolve an inconsistency between the @PropertySource and @Value we need to introduce an XML context that looks like this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
       xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
       xmlns:context="http://www.springframework.org/schema/context"
       xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans.xsd http://www.springframework.org/schema/context http://www.springframework.org/schema/context/spring-context.xsd">

    <!--In Java @Configuration POJOs the @PropertySource is
        not playing well with @Value. To resolve this we introduce
        just this reference that is doing the trick. No other dependency on
        XML configuration should be needed.-->
    <context:property-placeholder />
</beans>

Finally the JUnit test looks like this:

package com.dimitrisli.springEmailTest;

import com.dimitrisli.springEmailTest.config.AppConfig;
import com.icegreen.greenmail.util.GreenMail;
import com.icegreen.greenmail.util.GreenMailUtil;
import com.icegreen.greenmail.util.ServerSetupTest;
import org.junit.After;
import org.junit.Before;
import org.junit.Test;
import org.junit.runner.RunWith;
import org.springframework.mail.SimpleMailMessage;
import org.springframework.mail.javamail.JavaMailSenderImpl;
import org.springframework.test.context.ContextConfiguration;
import org.springframework.test.context.junit4.SpringJUnit4ClassRunner;

import javax.annotation.Resource;
import javax.mail.Message;
import javax.mail.MessagingException;

import static org.junit.Assert.assertEquals;
import static org.junit.Assert.assertTrue;

@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
@ContextConfiguration(classes = AppConfig.class)
public class EmailTest {

    @Resource
    private JavaMailSenderImpl emailSender;

    private GreenMail testSmtp;

    @Before
    public void testSmtpInit(){
        testSmtp = new GreenMail(ServerSetupTest.SMTP);
        testSmtp.start();

        //don't forget to set the test port!
        emailSender.setPort(3025);
        emailSender.setHost("localhost");
    }

    @Test
    public void testEmail() throws InterruptedException, MessagingException {
        SimpleMailMessage message = new SimpleMailMessage();

        message.setFrom("test@sender.com");
        message.setTo("test@receiver.com");
        message.setSubject("test subject");
        message.setText("test message");
        emailSender.send(message);
        
        Message[] messages = testSmtp.getReceivedMessages();
        assertEquals(1, messages.length);
        assertEquals("test subject", messages[0].getSubject());
        String body = GreenMailUtil.getBody(messages[0]).replaceAll("=\r?\n", "");
        assertEquals("test message", body);
    }

    @After
    public void cleanup(){
        testSmtp.stop();
    }
}

– JUnit is configured to run with Spring using the SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class
– JUnit is loading the Spring context as instructed by the @ContextConfiguration annotation pointing to the Java Configuration class.
– The @Resource annotation is autowiring the bean dependency directly on our test conveniently having it initialised during the test runtime.
– We have an init() activity marked by JUnit’s @Before annotation where we instantiate our GreenMail mail server and changing the port of our email service to a test one.
– The test method itself is a simple manner of initialising a test SimpleMailMessage and sending it via our email service that gets intercepted by GreenMail and further queried upon concerning the data received.
– A cleanup functionality is closing the resourced during the @After JUnit instructed method.

The source code can be found in this Github repo.

Spring, JdbcTemplate, Oracle example

This is a demonstration of how Spring and Oracle are playing happily together via JdbcTemplate.

Prerequisites:

Let’s start from the end: this is how the JUnit 4 test case looks like for the DAO of our domain object for all its CRUD operations armored with rollback functionality so our database data are not being altered after our transactional operations. Notice the use of matchers and the spring-context-enabling annotation of the test class:

package com.dimitrisli.springJdbcOracle.dao.impl;

import com.dimitrisli.springJdbcOracle.dao.LocationDao;
import com.dimitrisli.springJdbcOracle.model.Location;
import org.junit.Test;
import org.junit.runner.RunWith;
import static org.junit.Assert.*;
import static org.hamcrest.CoreMatchers.*;
import org.springframework.test.context.ContextConfiguration;
import org.springframework.test.context.junit4.SpringJUnit4ClassRunner;
import org.springframework.test.context.transaction.TransactionConfiguration;
import org.springframework.transaction.annotation.Transactional;

import javax.inject.Inject;
import java.util.List;

@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
@ContextConfiguration(locations = "/spring/context/applicationContext.xml")
@TransactionConfiguration(transactionManager = "jdbcTransactionManager", defaultRollback = true)
@Transactional
public class LocationDaoTest {

    @Inject private LocationDao locationDao;

    @Test
    public void testSelectAllLocations(){
    List<Location> locations = locationDao.getLocations();
    assertThat(locations.size(), is(23));
    }

    @Test
    public void testSelectOneLocation(){
      Location location = locationDao.getLocation(1000L);
      assertNotNull("test entry not found", location);
    }

    @Test
    public void testDeleteLocation(){
        assertNotNull("entry for test should be there", locationDao.getLocation(1000L));
        locationDao.deleteLocation(1000L);
        assertNull("entry wasn't successfully deleted", locationDao.getLocation(1000L));
    }

    @Test
    public void testInsertLocation(){
        Location location = new Location(1000L,"test","11111","athens","athens","IT");
        int sizeBeforeInsert = locationDao.getLocations().size();
        locationDao.createLocation(location);
        assertThat(locationDao.getLocations().size(),is(sizeBeforeInsert + 1));
    }

    @Test
    public void testUpdateLocation(){
        Location newLocation = new Location(1000L,"test","11111","athens","athens","IT");
        locationDao.updateLocation(newLocation);
        Location changedLocation = locationDao.getLocation(1000L);
        assertThat(changedLocation.getStreetAddress(), is("test"));
    }

}

The POM looks like this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0"
         xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
         xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/xsd/maven-4.0.0.xsd">
    <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>

    <groupId>SpringJdbcOracle</groupId>
    <artifactId>SpringJdbcOracle</artifactId>
    <version>1.0</version>


    <build>
        <plugins>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
                <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
                <version>2.3.2</version>
                <configuration>
                    <source>1.6</source>
                    <target>1.6</target>
                    <encoding>${project.build.sourceEncoding}</encoding>
                </configuration>
            </plugin>

            <!--Logging related plugin
                this plugin breaks the build if non-wanted logging frameworks are spotted in the classpath
            -->
            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
                <artifactId>maven-enforcer-plugin</artifactId>
                <version>1.0.1</version>
                <executions>
                    <execution>
                        <id>enforce-versions</id>
                        <goals>
                            <goal>enforce</goal>
                        </goals>
                        <configuration>
                            <rules>
                                <bannedDependencies>
                                    <excludes>
                                        <exclude>commons-logging:commons-logging</exclude>
                                        <exclude>log4j:log4j</exclude>
                                    </excludes>
                                </bannedDependencies>
                            </rules>
                        </configuration>
                    </execution>
                </executions>
            </plugin>
        </plugins>
    </build>

    <dependencies>
        <!--Spring related dependencies -->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-jdbc</artifactId>
            <version>${spring.version}</version>
            <exclusions>
                <exclusion>
                    <groupId>commons-logging</groupId>
                    <artifactId>commons-logging</artifactId>
                </exclusion>
            </exclusions>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-test</artifactId>
            <version>${spring.version}</version>
            <exclusions>
                <exclusion>
                    <groupId>commons-logging</groupId>
                    <artifactId>commons-logging</artifactId>
                </exclusion>
            </exclusions>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>javax.inject</groupId>
            <artifactId>javax.inject</artifactId>
            <version>1</version>
        </dependency>


        <!--Oracle jdbc driver-->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>com.oracle</groupId>
            <artifactId>ojdbc6</artifactId>
            <version>11.2.0.3</version>
        </dependency>

        <!-- DB Connection Pool -->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>commons-dbcp</groupId>
            <artifactId>commons-dbcp</artifactId>
            <version>1.4</version>
        </dependency>

        <!--Logging related dependencies
            Further info: http://www.slf4j.org/faq.html#excludingJCL and
                          http://blog.frankel.ch/configuring-maven-to-use-slf4j
        -->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>ch.qos.logback</groupId>
            <artifactId>logback-classic</artifactId>
            <!--scope should be runtime but applied at compile time
                to get autocompletion visibility at logback.xml-->
            <!--scope>runtime</scope-->
            <version>0.9.24</version>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.slf4j</groupId>
            <artifactId>slf4j-api</artifactId>
            <version>1.6.1</version>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.slf4j</groupId>
            <artifactId>jcl-over-slf4j</artifactId>
            <version>1.7.2</version>
        </dependency>

        <!-- JUnit 4 -->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>junit</groupId>
            <artifactId>junit</artifactId>
            <version>4.10</version>
        </dependency>

        <!-- Misc -->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>cglib</groupId>
            <artifactId>cglib</artifactId>
            <version>2.2.2</version>
            <scope>runtime</scope>
        </dependency>


    </dependencies>

    <properties>
        <project.build.sourceEncoding>UTF-8</project.build.sourceEncoding>
        <spring.version>3.1.2.RELEASE</spring.version>
     </properties>


</project>

Notes:
– Note how we explicitly piping any commons logging or log4j logging through our logback slf4j wrapper
– Notice how we are declaring our Oracle driver dependency given that it’s already installed in our local Maven repo (see prerequisites section)

The applicationContext:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
       xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
       xmlns:context="http://www.springframework.org/schema/context"
       xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans.xsd http://www.springframework.org/schema/context http://www.springframework.org/schema/context/spring-context.xsd">

    <import resource="classpath*:spring/database/database.xml"/>
    <context:component-scan base-package="com.dimitrisli.springJdbcOracle" />
</beans>

The imported database context above is:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
       xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
       xmlns:p="http://www.springframework.org/schema/p"
       xmlns:tx="http://www.springframework.org/schema/tx"
       xmlns:c="http://www.springframework.org/schema/c"
       xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans.xsd http://www.springframework.org/schema/tx http://www.springframework.org/schema/tx/spring-tx.xsd">

    <bean  class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer"
           p:location="properties/database.properties" />

    <bean  id="dataSource"
           class="org.apache.commons.dbcp.BasicDataSource"
           destroy-method="close"
           p:driverClassName="${jdbc.driverClassName}"
           p:url="${jdbc.url}"
           p:username="${jdbc.username}"
           p:password="${jdbc.password}" />

    <bean  class="org.springframework.jdbc.core.namedparam.NamedParameterJdbcTemplate"
           c:dataSource-ref="dataSource"  />

    <bean  id="jdbcTransactionManager" class="org.springframework.jdbc.datasource.DataSourceTransactionManager"
            p:dataSource-ref="dataSource"/>
    <tx:annotation-driven transaction-manager="jdbcTransactionManager"/>

</beans>

Notes:

– We are using DBCP for our DB connection pool datasource
– We are using the parameter namespace to save on some attribute injection open-close xml characters
– We are explicitly stating NamedParameterJdbcTemplate as our jdbcTemplate and inject it with the needed datasource so we can have it available for injection conveniently in our DAOs.

The domain POJO object we are about to play with is the Location object that corresponds to the Locations table on the Oracle HR schema:


package com.dimitrisli.springJdbcOracle.model;

public class Location {

    private Long locationId;
    private String streetAddress;
    private String postalCode;
    private String city;
    private String stateProvince;
    private String countryId;

    public Location(Long locationId, String streetAddress, String postalCode, String city, String stateProvince, String countryId) {
        this.locationId = locationId;
        this.streetAddress = streetAddress;
        this.postalCode = postalCode;
        this.city = city;
        this.stateProvince = stateProvince;
        this.countryId = countryId;
    }

//getters, hashcode(), equals(), toString() ignored for brevity

The RowMapper that will provide Location objects having resultSets coming from the DB. It’s a factory method (although not static but stateless by our design) used internally from Spring per DB line result returned:

package com.dimitrisli.springJdbcOracle.orm;

import com.dimitrisli.springJdbcOracle.model.Location;
import org.springframework.jdbc.core.RowMapper;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Component;

import java.sql.ResultSet;
import java.sql.SQLException;

@Component
public class LocationRowMapper implements RowMapper<Location> {

    @Override
    public Location mapRow(ResultSet rs, int rowNum) throws SQLException {
        return  new Location(rs.getLong("LOCATION_ID"),
                             rs.getString("STREET_ADDRESS"),
                             rs.getString("POSTAL_CODE"),
                             rs.getString("CITY"),
                             rs.getString("STATE_PROVINCE"),
                             rs.getString("COUNTRY_ID"));
    }
}

Here’s the DAO interface responsible for the CRUD operations:

package com.dimitrisli.springJdbcOracle.dao;

import com.dimitrisli.springJdbcOracle.model.Location;

import java.util.List;

public interface LocationDao {

    public void createLocation(Location location);
    public List<Location> getLocations();
    public Location getLocation(Long locationId);
    public void updateLocation(Location location);
    public void deleteLocation(Long locationId);

}

and its implementation looks like this:


package com.dimitrisli.springJdbcOracle.dao.impl;

import com.dimitrisli.springJdbcOracle.dao.LocationDao;
import com.dimitrisli.springJdbcOracle.model.Location;
import com.dimitrisli.springJdbcOracle.orm.LocationRowMapper;
import org.springframework.jdbc.core.namedparam.MapSqlParameterSource;
import org.springframework.jdbc.core.namedparam.NamedParameterJdbcOperations;
import org.springframework.jdbc.core.namedparam.SqlParameterSource;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Repository;

import javax.inject.Inject;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.List;

@Repository("locationDao")
public class LocationDaoImpl implements LocationDao {

    private static final String CREATE_SQL = "INSERT INTO LOCATIONS( LOCATION_ID, STREET_ADDRESS, POSTAL_CODE, CITY, " +
                                             "STATE_PROVINCE, COUNTRY_ID) " +
                                             "VALUES (LOCATIONS_SEQ.NEXTVAL, :streetAddress, :postalCode, :city, " +
                                             ":stateProvince, :countryId)";

    private static final String GET_ALL_SQL = "SELECT LOCATION_ID, STREET_ADDRESS, POSTAL_CODE, CITY, STATE_PROVINCE, COUNTRY_ID " +
                                              "FROM LOCATIONS";

    private static final String GET_SQL = "SELECT LOCATION_ID, STREET_ADDRESS, POSTAL_CODE, CITY, STATE_PROVINCE, COUNTRY_ID " +
                                          "FROM LOCATIONS WHERE LOCATION_ID = :locationId";

    private static final String DELETE_SQL = "DELETE LOCATIONS WHERE LOCATION_ID = :locationId";

    private static final String UPDATE_SQL = "UPDATE LOCATIONS SET STREET_ADDRESS = :streetAddress, POSTAL_CODE=:postalCode, " +
                                            "CITY = :city, STATE_PROVINCE = :stateProvince, COUNTRY_ID = :countryId " +
                                            "WHERE LOCATION_ID = :locationId";

    @Inject private NamedParameterJdbcOperations jdbcTemplate;
    @Inject private LocationRowMapper locationRowMapper;

    @Override
    public void createLocation(Location location) {
        SqlParameterSource params = new MapSqlParameterSource()
                .addValue("streetAddress", location.getStreetAddress())
                .addValue("postalCode", location.getPostalCode())
                .addValue("city", location.getCity())
                .addValue("stateProvince", location.getStateProvince())
                .addValue("countryId", location.getCountryId());
        jdbcTemplate.update(CREATE_SQL, params);
    }

    @Override
    public List<Location> getLocations() {
        return jdbcTemplate.query(GET_ALL_SQL, new HashMap<String, Object>(), locationRowMapper);
    }

    @Override
    public Location getLocation(Long locationId) {
        SqlParameterSource params = new MapSqlParameterSource()
                .addValue("locationId", locationId);
        List<Location> locations = jdbcTemplate.query(GET_SQL, params, locationRowMapper);
        return locations.isEmpty()?null:locations.get(0);
    }

    @Override
    public void updateLocation(Location location) {
        SqlParameterSource params = new MapSqlParameterSource()
                .addValue("locationId", location.getLocationId())
                .addValue("streetAddress", location.getStreetAddress())
                .addValue("postalCode", location.getPostalCode())
                .addValue("city", location.getCity())
                .addValue("stateProvince", location.getStateProvince())
                .addValue("countryId", location.getCountryId());
        jdbcTemplate.update(UPDATE_SQL, params);
    }

    @Override
    public void deleteLocation(Long locationId) {
        jdbcTemplate.update(DELETE_SQL, new MapSqlParameterSource("locationId",locationId));
    }
}

Notes:
– Notice how we inject the JdbcTemplate and not fetching it from this class directly
– Notice how we inject the RowMapper and we don’t anonymous-class-it from this class directly
– The CRUD operations are setup parameterized in the top of the file as private static finals
– In all the CRUD operations we are using either jdbcTemplate.update() or jdbcTemplate.query() methods

Here’s the Github repo of the project

Maven install ojdbc6

I really wished the Oracle driver jar was part of any (legal) publicly available Maven repo, but it’s not. So we’ll have to take matters on our hands and install it in our local repo once and for all so we can effortlessly thereafter summon it via our pom file:

       <dependency>
            <groupId>com.oracle</groupId>
            <artifactId>ojdbc6</artifactId>
            <version>11.2.0.3</version>
        </dependency>

Steps:

  • Download the jdbc6.jar from the Oracle website. I tried to automate this step via a Groovy script but this pesky agreement radio-button gets in the way (which is there for a reason to be fair)
  • Supposing mvn is already setup in your path:
  • mvn install:install-file -Dfile=ojdbc6.jar -DgroupId=com.oracle -DartifactId=ojdbc6 -Dversion=11.2.0.3 -Dpackaging=jar -DgeneratePom=true
    

Scala, Stripes simple example

Here’s the sample Stripes application using Scala.

The skeletal implementation of Stripes ActionBean for the purposes of our project holding the context:

package com.dimitrisli.scalastripeswebapp.controller

import net.sourceforge.stripes.action.{ActionBeanContext, ActionBean}
import reflect.BeanProperty


class BaseActionBean extends ActionBean {

  @BeanProperty var context: ActionBeanContext = _

}

The calculator represented as a Stripe action bean:

package com.dimitrisli.scalastripeswebapp.controller

import net.sourceforge.stripes.action._
import net.sourceforge.stripes.validation.{SimpleError, ValidationErrors, ValidationMethod, Validate}
import reflect.BeanProperty


class CalculatorActionBean extends BaseActionBean {

  @BeanProperty @Validate(required=true) var numberOne: Double = _
  @BeanProperty @Validate(required=true) var numberTwo: Double = _
  @BeanProperty var result: Double = _

  @DefaultHandler
  def addition: Resolution = {
    result = getNumberOne + getNumberTwo
    new ForwardResolution("/index.jsp");
  }

  def division: Resolution = {
    result = getNumberOne / getNumberTwo
    new ForwardResolution("/index.jsp");
  }

  @ValidationMethod(on=Array("division"))
  def avoidDevideByZero(errors: ValidationErrors): Unit =
    if (getNumberTwo == 0)
      errors.add("numberTwo", new SimpleError("Dividing by zero is not allowed."))
}

Our view represented by a JSP will be excluded due to formatting issues in WordPress (look below for the Github repository).

The web.xml setting up the Stripe’s dispatcher servlet, filter and all the necessary mappings will also not be presented due to the same xml formatting issues (look below for the Github repository).

This project’s code can be found in this Github repository

Java 7 in Maven Project

If you have both jdk6 and jdk7 installed and you would want to interchange between the two compilers in a maven project, this can be easily done by the maven-compiler-plugin and its source and target parameters.

Assuming that we have created a JAVA_7_HOME environment variable we can point the maven-compiler-plugin to the jdk7 compiler as follows:

  		<plugin>
  			<groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
  			<artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
  			<version>2.3.2</version>
  			<configuration>
  				<source>1.7</source>
  				<target>1.7</target>
  				<encoding>${project.build.sourceEncoding}</encoding>			
  				<executable>${env.JAVA_7_HOME}</executable>
  			</configuration>
  		</plugin>

I have also created a 2-module Maven project one for each jdk that you can find in this Github repository.

Scala, Spring, Maven example

This is a quick, bare minimum example of how Scala, Spring and Maven live happily together.

First, in the default directory structure that Maven offers out of the box, we need to create two new dirs:

  • /src/main/scala
  • /test/main/scala

If you are managing the project from within Eclipse or IntelliJ you’ll have to denote these dirs as source folders explicitly.

The POM looks like this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0"
         xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
         xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/xsd/maven-4.0.0.xsd">
    <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>

    <groupId>ScalaSpringMaven</groupId>
    <artifactId>ScalaSpringMaven</artifactId>
    <version>1.0</version>
    <build>
        <plugins>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
                <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
                <version>2.3.2</version>
            </plugin>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.scala-tools</groupId>
                <artifactId>maven-scala-plugin</artifactId>
                <version>2.15.2</version>
                <executions>
                    <execution>
                        <goals>
                            <goal>compile</goal>
                            <goal>testCompile</goal>
                        </goals>
                    </execution>
                </executions>
            </plugin></plugins>
    </build>
    <dependencies>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-context</artifactId>
            <version>3.1.1.RELEASE</version>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.scala-lang</groupId>
            <artifactId>scala-compiler</artifactId>
            <version>2.9.1</version>
        </dependency>
    </dependencies>

</project>
 

Note how the Scala compiler plugin hijacks the compile and testCompile phases of Maven lifecycle and happily co-exists with the Java compiler.

Next, the application context looks as follows:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
xmlns:context="http://www.springframework.org/schema/context"
xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans.xsd http://www.springframework.org/schema/context http://www.springframework.org/schema/context/spring-context-3.1.xsd">

<context:component-scan base-package="com.dimitrisli.scala"/>

</beans>

The above Spring config file looks identical like in any other Java project where we want to activate component scanning for post Spring 3 annotation-enabled beans.
Our Bean looks like:

package com.dimitrisli.scala

import org.springframework.stereotype.Component

@Component
class MyBean {

  def performTask = "Greetings from MyBean!"
}

and the Scala Object where we startup the Spring context:

package com.dimitrisli.scala

import org.springframework.context.ApplicationContext
import org.springframework.context.support.ClassPathXmlApplicationContext


object Application {

  def main(args: Array[String]) {

    val context:ApplicationContext = new ClassPathXmlApplicationContext("application-context.xml")
    val myBean:MyBean = context.getBean("myBean").asInstanceOf[MyBean]
    print(myBean performTask)
  }
}

The code can be found in this Github repository.

Eclipse SWT and Maven

I couldn’t find Eclipse SWT latest jar within a public Maven repository therefore I couldn’t summon it directly.

I can of course download the platform-specific jar and install it in my own local M2 repository:

mvn install:install-file -DgroupId=org.eclipse.swt.carbon -DartifactId=macosx -Dversion=3.7 -Dpackaging=jar -Dfile=swt-debug.jar

along with the sources:

mvn install:install-file -DgroupId=org.eclipse.swt.carbon -DartifactId=macosx -Dversion=3.7 -Dpackaging=jar -Dfile=src.zip -Dclassifier=sources